Convergence

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Convergence

I hope to find
be-smattered, splattered
artistic lines
with just one sound
that do not bind or hide
behind the grind
of predesigned ,
chaotic,
aesthetic,
frenetic formation

Be disinclined, to define a path
that is assigned to
those confined, in classic strokes.

Enshrined in order, I’ll be more blind and
will unwind to write with art entwined,
combined, in kind, six lines, maligned!

I‘m not defined
or redesigned by art that’s
past.
Unassigned and realigned,
I hope to find artistic lines.

Colour is carved upon this page
in so many unconventional ways
till free verse comes along and says
that originality is in decay.

———-

Explanation:

In the first instance I aimed to take the title convergence quite literally, to converge words and sounds into one another to create something that was chaotic, fast moving and self-explanatory.

Pollock’s work is the embodiment of liberated artistic licence. I find so much drama and antagonism within his work that I feel there is no greater counterpart than free verse poetry. It is through the abstract creation of symbiotic lines that I hoped to transform his art into my poetry.

The poem works one three levels:

  • It aims to describe my process of transforming his work into my own, to involve myself in my work as much as Pollock did with his. To remain repetitive but curved and interesting.
  • The second was to create a narrative that was self-aware of its own chaos. I broke the rhyming pattern in the last stanza to exemplify this; drawing attention to the fact that the poem had started to critique it’s own judgements.
  • Finally I wanted to draw attention to what Pollock’s work means to me as a source of inspiration. To be bold and look for the ‘new’ in all of my work, but mostly to always try and break the mould.

The line combined, in kind, six lines, maligned!’ was originally the last line of a 6-line stanza that I broke up for aesthetic purposes. I felt it would be unjust on the trigger piece to remove this, and also hermetically sealed in meaning to a reader, much like Pollok’s work is.

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